But we could thtill have a really good time.

And if you have anything to say or ask, please feel free!

jesuschristvevo:

tits-clits-and-tayl0rswift:

jesuschristvevo:

are u printed on a popsicle stick? bc ur a joke

image

can’t handle these.

your url is making me nervous

colchrishadfield:

Good morning, Earth! Announcing a new book, full of unpublished space photos, with notes and comments. Coming in October.

colchrishadfield:

Good morning, Earth! Announcing a new book, full of unpublished space photos, with notes and comments. Coming in October.

sim0nbaz:

foxsan:

shuttersmiley:

sourcedumal:

jackthebard:

Just remember. There is no such thing as a fake geek girl.
There are only fake geek boys.
Science fiction was invented by a woman.

image

Specifically a teenage girl. You know, someone who would be a part of the demographic that some of these boys are violently rejecting.

Isaac Asimov.

yo mary shelley wrote frankenstein in 1818 and isaac asimov was born in 1920 so you kinda get my point

colchrishadfield:

The new book will be called You Are Here - Around the World in 92 Minutes. Dawn shadows on the Hudson, New York City.

colchrishadfield:

The new book will be called You Are Here - Around the World in 92 Minutes. Dawn shadows on the Hudson, New York City.

singasaranade:

fangirl challenge - [1/10] actresses - Karen Allen

If there are no other wonderful roles that come my way, I have a quite an interesting, dynamic life.

   

epic-humor:

emtothethird:
I ACCIDENTALLY MADE THE CUTEST COOKIE IN THE WHOLE WORLD YESTERDAY.

epic-humor:

emtothethird:

I ACCIDENTALLY MADE THE CUTEST COOKIE IN THE WHOLE WORLD YESTERDAY.

(Source: emtothethird)

colchrishadfield:

Been having throwback fun going through the tens of thousands of photos to choose. The Outback: unselfconscious beauty.

colchrishadfield:

Been having throwback fun going through the tens of thousands of photos to choose. The Outback: unselfconscious beauty.

hurpadootdoot:

romeoisadick:

inbox:

inbox:

in Canada they don’t pronounce Z as "zee"

they pronounce it as "zed" and that is crazy to me

it sounds like they made a typo when they invented it

They do that everywhere in the world that’s not America. We do that here in the UK too.
America is weird man.

wetheurban:

ART: Sky Art Illustrations by Thomas Lamadieu

Genius French artist Thomas Lamadieu has illustrated a series of scenes in the sky directly onto photographs of urban landscapes.

Read More

aerloxlehkka:

verhungernde:

fun fact: you don’t cure depression by telling me i have nothing to be sad about

another fun fact: you dont cure anxiety by just getting up and doing whatever it is that makes you anxious

(Source: merankoria)

georgetakei:

Sometimes corporate brand messaging goes a bit too far. #TheyreWithYouInThe Flush http://ift.tt/1lJncf3

georgetakei:

Sometimes corporate brand messaging goes a bit too far. #TheyreWithYouInThe Flush http://ift.tt/1lJncf3

spacettf:

Professional and Amateur Astronomers Join Forces (NASA, Chandra, 04/13/14) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Long before the term “citizen science” was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who 
study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours exploring the cosmos through a variety of 
telescopes that they acquire, maintain, and improve on their own. Some of these amateur astronomers specialize in capturing 
what is seen through their telescopes in images and are astrophotographers.
What happens when the work of amateur astronomers and astrophotographers is combined with the data from some of the world’s 
most sophisticated space telescopes? Collaborations between professional and amateur astronomers reveal the possibilities and 
are intended to raise interest and awareness among the community of the wealth of data publicly available in NASA’s various 
mission archives. This effort is particularly appropriate for this month because April marks Global Astronomy Month, the 
world’s largest global celebration of astronomy.
The images in this quartet of galaxies represent a sample of composites created with X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray 
Observatory, infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and optical data collected by an amateur astronomer. In these 
images, the X-rays from Chandra are shown in pink, infrared emission from Spitzer is red, and the optical data are in red, 
green, and blue. The two astrophotographers who donated their images for these four images — Detlef Hartmann and Rolf Olsen 
— used their personal telescopes of 17.5 inches and 10 inches in diameter respectively. More details on how these images 
were made can be found in this blog post.
Starting in the upper left and moving clockwise, the galaxies are M101 (the “Pinwheel Galaxy”), M81, Centaurus A, and M51 
(the “Whirlpool Galaxy”). M101 is a spiral galaxy like our Milky Way, but about 70% bigger. It is located about 21 million 
light years from Earth. M81 is a spiral galaxy about 12 million light years away that is both relatively large in the sky and 
bright, making it a frequent target for both amateur and professional astronomers. Centaurus A is the fifth brightest galaxy 
in the sky — making it an ideal target for amateur astronomers — and is famous for the dust lane across its middle and a 
giant jet blasting away from the supermassive black hole at its center. Finally, M51 is another spiral galaxy, about 30 
million light years away, that is in the process of merging with a smaller galaxy seen to its upper left. 
For many amateur astronomers and astrophotographers, a main goal of their efforts is to observe and share the wonders of the 
Universe. However, the long exposures of these objects may help to reveal phenomena that may otherwise be missed in the 
relatively short snapshots taken by major telescopes, which are tightly scheduled and often oversubscribed by professional 
astronomers. Therefore, projects like this Astro Pro-Am collaboration might prove useful not only for producing spectacular 
images, but also contributing to the knowledge of what is happening in each of these cosmic vistas.
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate 
in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., controls Chandra’s science and flight 
operations.
Original caption/more images: www.nasa.gov/chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2014/proam/
Image credit: Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: Detlef Hartmann; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech

spacettf:

Professional and Amateur Astronomers Join Forces (NASA, Chandra, 04/13/14) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Long before the term “citizen science” was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who

study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours exploring the cosmos through a variety of

telescopes that they acquire, maintain, and improve on their own. Some of these amateur astronomers specialize in capturing

what is seen through their telescopes in images and are astrophotographers.

What happens when the work of amateur astronomers and astrophotographers is combined with the data from some of the world’s

most sophisticated space telescopes? Collaborations between professional and amateur astronomers reveal the possibilities and

are intended to raise interest and awareness among the community of the wealth of data publicly available in NASA’s various

mission archives. This effort is particularly appropriate for this month because April marks Global Astronomy Month, the

world’s largest global celebration of astronomy.

The images in this quartet of galaxies represent a sample of composites created with X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray

Observatory, infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and optical data collected by an amateur astronomer. In these

images, the X-rays from Chandra are shown in pink, infrared emission from Spitzer is red, and the optical data are in red,

green, and blue. The two astrophotographers who donated their images for these four images — Detlef Hartmann and Rolf Olsen

— used their personal telescopes of 17.5 inches and 10 inches in diameter respectively. More details on how these images

were made can be found in this blog post.

Starting in the upper left and moving clockwise, the galaxies are M101 (the “Pinwheel Galaxy”), M81, Centaurus A, and M51 

(the “Whirlpool Galaxy”). M101 is a spiral galaxy like our Milky Way, but about 70% bigger. It is located about 21 million

light years from Earth. M81 is a spiral galaxy about 12 million light years away that is both relatively large in the sky and

bright, making it a frequent target for both amateur and professional astronomers. Centaurus A is the fifth brightest galaxy

in the sky — making it an ideal target for amateur astronomers — and is famous for the dust lane across its middle and a

giant jet blasting away from the supermassive black hole at its center. Finally, M51 is another spiral galaxy, about 30 

million light years away, that is in the process of merging with a smaller galaxy seen to its upper left.

For many amateur astronomers and astrophotographers, a main goal of their efforts is to observe and share the wonders of the

Universe. However, the long exposures of these objects may help to reveal phenomena that may otherwise be missed in the

relatively short snapshots taken by major telescopes, which are tightly scheduled and often oversubscribed by professional

astronomers. Therefore, projects like this Astro Pro-Am collaboration might prove useful not only for producing spectacular

images, but also contributing to the knowledge of what is happening in each of these cosmic vistas.

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate

in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., controls Chandra’s science and flight

operations.

Original caption/more images: www.nasa.gov/chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2014/proam/

Image credit: Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: Detlef Hartmann; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech

lightthiscandle:

humanoidhistory:

APOLLO PHOTOBOMB — The Moon, April 23, 1972. As Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie Duke scoots along the lunar surface, mission commander John Young makes a quick cameo.

Oh, John.

lightthiscandle:

humanoidhistory:

APOLLO PHOTOBOMB — The Moon, April 23, 1972. As Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie Duke scoots along the lunar surface, mission commander John Young makes a quick cameo.

Oh, John.